Monday, November 10, 2008

MEDICINE

I had no idea it was already Quinta asserting its presence on Philippine territory when I left for Bohol during the early morning of Thursday, November 6. If Quinta was named after a woman, I could tell that, with the way it splattered it showers - hinay-hinay pero kanunay. It was almost demure, I thought. (So similar with the way Mefenamic acid takes effects each time us girls get our monthly dose of menstrual camps.) But I had to leave for Bohol to work, and even if I was surprised that it was raining when I got out of my apartment, I had no choice but brave the very dimpled and pimpled blue, courtesy of Quinta.

I brought with me an old newspaper. It was the first time I did that. It was a local paper released around two weeks ago. When I saw it, I was actually wondering why I took the effort to slip the paper into the pocket of my backpack the night before. I thought maybe I read something in it the night before and decided to finish it the following day so I brought it with me anyway. When I got out of the cab, the paper accidentally fell on a shallow pool of mud water, but still I picked it up, and brought it with me anyway. Brownish water was dripping from its wet parts. I was thinking there might really be something about this old issue that compelled me to still pick it up and not mind the puzzled glances of my fellow passengers.

When I arrived in Tagbilaran City, the newspaper was deposited into a forgotten corner - well, I should say almost, because yesterday, - at last - I decided to scan through it's pages and I realized that it must be Juan Mercado's column, working its magic on me, to bring the paper with me no matter what. This is what I wish to share to you. I found myself being treated to paroxysms of laughter while reading Inday's love story - kuno . I hope you will too. It gives an appropriate relief in these trying times we are in now. This is another Inday though, different from the one who gave us uniquely atraumatic nosebleeds and threatened Former President Estrada's Eraptions, with her amazing English-speaking skills. But still, she is equally amusing and entertaining. You'll find this Inday just trying to speak her heart out. You'll feel that she is simply, in love.

It made me remember an old joke about a Filipino asked by an American about directions to a certain house. Remembering astutely that one would only need to follow the street, then turn to the left corner once one sees a faucet (gripo in theVisayan term) by the roadside, the good-natured Bisaya said to the American, "Just straight that street and when you see grips, curvative to the left." I hope the American found his way. I bet he was looking for grapes. Well, the Filipino tried his best to help.

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